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Infographic: 5 ways to improve yourself in 10 minutes

Posted 172 Days Ago in: Coaching Articles

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When people consider improving themselves, they often think of the big picture goals - changing careers, losing weight, learning a language, and so on. However, as any coach will tell you, there are many little steps on the journey to self-improvement and breaking down these grandeur goals can make all the difference in the long run.

By setting aside little blocks of time each day, we can schedule in positive and productive tasks that will help us see a real difference in our lives. Start with these 5 simple ways to improve yourself in 10 minutes.

1. Meditation

Meditation has never been more accessible with numerous apps, guided sessions and how-to books teaching you to integrate meditation into a busy schedule. By taking a short time to breathe and slow your mind, you will benefit from reduced stress-levels, more energy and a clearer mind. Take 10 minutes every day to calm your mind and reset with meditation. 

2. Affirmations

Start every morning with 10 minutes of positive ‘you-time’ and set your intentions for the day with a set of positive affirmations. These simple statements can empower you to focus on the opportunities that welcome you each day, ultimately allowing you to think more proactively and positively. Set aside a few minutes each day to remind yourself of your greatness and repeat a set of daily affirmations. 

3. Move your body 

Exercise has can reduce your risk of major illnesses including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer by up to 50%, according to the NHS. You don’t have to commit to hour-long workouts every day to experience the benefits of exercise. Instead, you can set this time a few times a week and commit yourself to 10 minutes every day. Use your lunch break for a brisk walk, or factor desk yoga into your routine for a short time each day and reap the benefits of moving your body daily. 

4. Practise a skill 

Imagine if you took 10 minutes every day and dedicated it to practicing a skill. Overtime, committing this relatively small and manageable chunk of time can help you master any skill, whether it’s learning a new language, practising an instrument or learning to cook. With some focus, 10 minutes a day can make a huge difference to your skillset. 

5. Use the 50/10 rule 

The 50/10 rule can increase your productivity by segmenting and breaking up work tasks. Firstly, you commit to focusing on your work for 50 minutes, turning off any notifications or distractions. When these 50 minutes are over, you reward yourself with a 10-minute break. It can work wonders for your attention, task management and productivity as 50 minutes of uninterrupted work with a 10-minute break is both manageable and can help divide up daily tasks. 

If used well, 10 minutes is enough time to begin improving your life and yourself. It’s possible to make your life happier, healthier and more fulfilling by setting aside small increments of time each day and devoting them to your self-improvement. 

What are some of your daily self-improvement practices? Share them with us in the comments below. 

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self improvement self development personal development personal growth self improvement infographic meditation positive affirmations exercise practise a skill new skills happy life fulfilled life coaching

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